Stocznie Nowego Yorku

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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 14:26

Burtis & Morgan. , Brooklyn
grounded 1844

1845 Alice 326t steamer Isaac Newson, NY
1845 Saint Nicholas 413t steamer Isaac Newson, NY
1845 Shepherd Knapp 186t steamer Joseph C. Coffee, NY
1845 Roger Williams 447t C.H. & B.F. Woolsey, NY
1846 Perry 255t steamer George Woolsey, NY (ON19919)
1846 Excelsior 342t steamer Hunt & Nelson, NY
1847 Manhattan 447t steamer Hunt & Nelson, NY (ON16663)
1848 Osceola 177t screw steamer Buck & Co ,Middletown, Conn.
1849 Manhattan 326t ferry Union Ferry Co. To Philadelpha interests 1863, to US Govt 1864, barge 1867
1849 Hudosn 528t ferry Jersey City ferry Co.
1849 Active 99t steamer James H.Howe, NY sold foreign 1869
1850 Whitehall 323t ferry Union Ferry Co. To US Govt 1861, sunk 1862
1851 Colden 577 ferry 168 x 32 x 11 Pennsylvania RR converted to barge, 1891
1851 Gowanus 417 ferry Union Ferry Co. Abandoned 1857
1852 Fulton 410t ferry Union Ferry Co. Sold 1863, abandoned 1867


barge Swiftsure Line
barge Swiftsure Line
barge Troy & Erie Lines
barge Noneea N.Y.& E.R.R. Co.
barge Rocakland N.Y.& E.R.R. Co.
barge Chomung N.Y.& E.R.R. Co.
barge Cunisto N.Y.& E.R.R. Co.
steamer Corden Jersey City ferry Co.


DIED - Obituary - NYTimes.com
JOHN MORGAN, late of the firm of Burtis & Morgan, in the 75th year of his age. The relatives and friends are invited to attend his funeral, on Monday, ...
http://www.nytimes.com/1865/02/12/news/died.html
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 16:39

D. Burtis & Co., New York, NY

1839 barge Isaac Newton
1839 Baloon 204t steamer Isaac Newton
1839 North America 491t Isaac Newton
1840 South America 640t Isaac Newton
1841 ?? barges Isaac Newton
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 16:49

Capes & Burtis, Brooklyn,

1835 Robert L.Stevens 298t steamer 175x34 engine 36''x10'' R.L.Stevens (NY) ,
1835 States's Rights 119 steamer ferry 90'x21'3'' engines by R.L.Stevens owned Capt. Mickle, Philadelphia (KNY)
1836 Passaic 292t steamer 150x21'2''x8'8'' engined P.Kipp 90nhp R.L.Stevens (built Williamsburg, N. Y.) (ON19908)
1836 Swallow 426t steamer 224x22 West Point Foundry 46''x1o' ' Anthony Hoffman of New York City and others for operation on the New York- Albany run (WCB)
1836 Utica 340t steamer 180 x 21 x 8V2 feet,engined West Point Foundry 39''x1o' Isaac Newton, NY (WCB)
1836 Jonas C.Heartt 179t steamer (NY)
1836 Cardenas 197t steamer (Caardnass ?) (NY) sold foreign 1837
1840 Troy 724 steamer engine by West Point Foundry Hudosn River ( built William Capes ,Williamsburg, N. Y.)
1848 Oswego 390t steamer , 212 x 28 engine by Henry R. Dunham & Company's Archimedes Works cylinder 52 inches diameter by 1 1 feet stroke.
(NY)- reported built New York
(KNY) Kingston,NY
(WCB) - reported built William Capes, Brooklyn

barge for R.L.Stevens
barge for R.L.Stevens
Puritan steamer R.L.Stevens


Harmossey steamer Wm.Kimble
Splendid steamer

New-York register and city directory
1834
Capes & Burtis, shipwrights 155 West


William Capes, ship carpenter, lived in 1840 on the Williamsburgh Road.
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 17:33

Tu zbiore parowce zbod. Brooklyn bez stoczni :-o

paddle Henry Wells 396t 1855 Brooklyn, N. Y. New York, N. Y. sold Foreign 1856 Colombia renamed Elena Simmonds
schooner "William H.Gilliland" 347.80 1855 Brooklyn, N. Y. D.B.Vincent ,New York, N. Y
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 18:23

Capes & Allison, (at Hoboken,) in 1849
Hoboken, New Jersey

William Capes 270t C.Clark & Co
Hoboken 345t Capes & Allison,
1849 Taboga 226t steamer Capt A. Forbes
Olivia H.Lee 235t F.Waterbury
1849 Union (?) 125t Haidin Hall (Hayden H. Hall) re-assembled 1850 at Whampoa, China
Castille (?) 308
Miedazy (?) 143 Haidin Hall (Hayden H. Hall)
1852 James Watt 503t Hoboken Ferry Co. (ON 13165)
1851 C.P.Williams 230t schooner J.Psunlkenburgh (?) -> USN C.P. Williams (1862-1865)
1851 City of New York 804 P.Snrayne & Co engined Hogg & Delamator, New York, NY
1851 Independence 1085t steamer L.McKay lost 1852
America (?) 600 W.Wemore
1851 Atlas 119 barge
1851 Globe 166 barge
1852 Pacer 285t Schooner
1852 Irene 316t Barge (also 238t)
1852 Philadelphia 477 ferry Jersey City Ferry Co.
1852 Chancellor Livingston 355t Hoboken Ferry Co.
1853 James H. Chadbourne 378.57 schooner John D,Harris & John Saxton ,NY reg Willmington
1853 ?? 158t Austin & Co
1853 ?? 90t Austin & Co
1854 C.G. Waterbury 200t schooner W.Cook
1854 Marshal Nye 220t screw steamer
1854 Potomskia 360t screw steamer Machinery by Ho Delamater, New York. Intended service, New York and New Bedford
1854 Acorn 200t screw steamer
1855 Elizabeth C.Felter 389.36t John Arnolds , Squan, NJ enrollment New York 136,4'x31.6'x10'

Before

1840 Onkahye, a schooner yacht of a radical R. L. Stevens design, was laid down in 1839 by William Capes, Williamsburg, N. Y.; launched in 1840; purchased by the Navy in early 1843; and commissioned at Gosport Navy Yard, Va., 11 July 1843, Lt. William C. Whittle in command.e:
1844 "Gimcrack," in the cabin of which the New York Yacht Club was born, was built for Mr. Stevens by William Capes, of Hoboken, after designs by George Steers. She was about 51 feet in extreme length, 13 feet 6 inches beam, .
1846 Maria 1 mast yacht sloop 110ft Robert L.Stevens designed for his brother John, which was built in the nearby yard of William Capes at Hoboken. ... Bowsprits and figureheads projected over South Street and Front Street; New York and Brooklyn were small, independent cities.
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 21:53

W Hoboken , NJ byly zdudowane nastepujace parowce
p Phoenix (U) 1808 Hoboken, N. J. (D) A 1816 First steam vessel to go to sea (New York-Philadelphia), June, 1809 built & engined by John Stevens
p Hoboken (f) 207 1822 New York, N. Y. A 1856 built & engined by John Stevens
p Trenton 220 1825 Lamberton, N. J. A 1866 built & engined by John Stevens
p Burlington 230 1827 Lamberton, N. J. A 1866 built & engined by John Stevens
p North America 430 1827 Hoboken ferry boat , New York, N. Y. L 1839 built Wm.Capes designed and engined by John Stevens

Colonel John Stevens
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stevens_(inventor)
sons

James A.
Robert Stevens
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-03, 22:27

Isaac C.Smith Hoboken, N. J.

ship Margaret Eliza 550t 1850 W.de Forrest & co
ship ??? 563t 1850 W.de Forrest & co
p Wilson Small 258 1851 New York, N. Y. L 1867 U.S. Sanitary Commission search & rescue launch, 1862
ship Karana 590 1851 O-J.Hayes
ship Hurricane 10.1851 1308t C.W.&H.Thomas extreme clipper
Camille 27ßt Grumner & co
s Angeline K. Corning ON869 98 1852 I New York, N. Y. L 1872 Also documented Angeline Corning
p Golden Gate ON10513 170 1852 C.G.Allen & Co., Perth Amboy, N. J. A 1880 Sold U.S.Q.M.D., 4/2/63; redocumented, 5/13/67
p Atlas 1134 742 1852 Perth Amboy, N. J. A 1889
schooner Enchantress 1852 378.11t 125.8'x30.6'x11' William I.Tyler, Brookhaven enrollment #562 9.9.1852
p Deer 6263 130 1852 Coffin , Holmes & Co. ,New York, N. Y. L 1879
p Peter G. Coffin ON19911 358 1852 Coffin , Holmes & Co. ,New York, N. Y. L 1879
schooner Gardner Pike 1853 305.13t 121.9'x30.3'x9.3' Henry L.Slaght & James A. Van Burnt ,New York, N. Y
clipper Gravina 818t 1853 Howes & Co, New York
bark Tejorca 470t 1854 Napier & Johnson -> Wm. A.Sale, Jr., New York
p Ocean Wave 19033 270 1853 Shrewsbury line
p Pilot 163 1854 Wm.Duckeny
sloop Olympia 200t 1854 by builders
p Paterson 19907 360 1854 ferry Hoboken Ferry Co.
schooner ??? 275t 15.10.1854 Van Brucht, Schlacht & others
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-04, 16:48

Mott and Ayres New York NY

Steamboats all of iron
Magdalena Steamboat 1847 200t 120nhp Sold foreign 1847 La Compania de Vapores de Santa Marta
Nueva Granada Steamboat 1847 200t - not in yard list ?
Santa Marta Steamboat 1847 La Compania de Vapores de Santa Marta (sistership to Magdalena)
Raphael Rivas Steamboat 1850 110x23x12'' (palnned draft) 20'' (actually) Panama R.R. Co.
Gorgona Steamboat 184 1850 Panama R.R. Co.
Manzanares Steamboat 344 1852 Sold foreign 1853 La Compania de Vapores de Santa Marta
Meta Steamboat 1853 Orinoco River c150' shipped in sections
Apure Steamboat 1853 Orinoco River c150' shipped in sections
Barinas Steamboat 1854 Orinoco River c150' sailed
Guyana Steamboat 1854 Orinoco River c150' sailed

1851
American Marine Enginerring.—A late number of the New York Courier and Enquirer contains a statement of the work then iu progress in the New York foundries. The Alluine Works, employing from 600 to 700 men, had on hand the engines of the Baltic, of the Collins' line, which are amongst the largest marine engines (side lever) in tho world. Two oscillating engines for a steam vessel of 2,200 tons, the largest engines hitherto constructed in America on that plan; two side-lever engines, of 65 inches diameter of cylinder, and 7 feet stroke, for another steam vessel; with many smaller engines for river boats, and a steam-press, were likewise on hand. Tho Archimedes Works, employing 300 men, a large engine for the steam-ship Pacific, five first-class sugar mills and engines, several steam boilers, and wrou^ht-iron gates, were in preparation. The Chelsea Iron Works, employing 300 men, were constructing two iron river steam-boats, a small iron vessel, water doors, &c. At the Fulton Foundry Works, employing 250 men, upwards of a dozen boilers, and nine or ten engines and boilers for California steamers and sugar mills, were being made. At the Morgan Iron Works, 600 men employed, had on hand two pairs of targe marine engines, five single engines of about 50 inches diameter of cylinder, and 10 feet stroke; five smaller engines for sugar mills, ferry boats, &c . The Novelty Works are the largest in New York, employing 1200 men. Here were being made the engines of the Arctic, 3,000 tons (Collins' line); of the Franklin, 2,300 tons, for Havre and New York; of the Florida, 1,300 tons; and of the Alabama, 1,300 tons, for each one side lever engine; also two oscillating engines for the Golden Gale, of 1,800 tons; one *ide lever engine for the Berry, of 1,000 tons; two side lever engines for the Columbia, 800 tons. The works at two other establishments are not detailed.

Michigan farmer, Band 10
1852
America:* Machinery.—An American 'writer, in a sketch of the works in progress at the principal iron foundries, says there are no foundries in England which cast such massive pieces nf machinery as those executed in New York; and in proof of this, describes the operations of several of the pnncipale firms.
Twelve iron columns, cast by Messrs. Mott and Avrcs, of the Chelsea Iron Works, for the Manhattan Gas Company, are [he l.irgest ever cast by 10ft. 8in., measuring 50ft. Sin. in length, 3 ft. in diameter at the base moulding. 2ft. at tho cap moulding, and weigh 27,360 lbs. each; they have been erected about the gasometer, aud are surrounded by girders 33 feat in length. They were also preparing an iron steamer for a passenger boat on the Magdalei.e river: her hull is of iron, rivetled together, and her deck is composed of white pine; she measures 167 feet in length on di ck, 30 feet beam and 7 feet hold, and is calculate! she will carry 70 tons, while drawing only 2 feet. 2 inches of water, which will show great buoyancy in a vessel of that description; when heavily loaded she will carry 31)0 or 350 tons. their health under too warm a climate. On the Andes they fix their abode at a height of ten or thirteen thousanc feet; in the Swiss Alps they are comfortable on tho mountain Hides, and spread in Berne to the height of five thousand feet, or not very much less. Over the north of Europe, the Potntoe family extends its labors farther on into the co'd than eve:i barlev, which is famous as the hardiest of grains. There is Potatoes settled in Iceland, though it is a place in which barley declines to live."— Dickon'i Household Word*.


TheThe Mechanics' magazine, museum, register, journal, and gazette, Band 53
1850
Chelsea Iron Works. Messrs. Mott and Ayres, proprietors of the "Chelsea Iron Works," have recently erected several spacious buildings in 26th■treet, near the North River ; and about the lint of last Jane they resumed their business that had been interrupted by a destructive fire occurring in their works, in 25th-street. They give constant employment to upwards of 300 mechanics, and the amount of machinery and other heavy ironwork turned out in the course of a year is enormous.
At these works is an iron steam-boat rapidly approaching completion, which has been built for the Panama Railroad Company, who intend to place her on some of the small rivers on the Pacific coast. She is 130 feet in length, 22 feet beam, 5j feet deep, and when light will only draw 13 inches of water. This model craft is to be propelled by two high-pressure engines, and when finished is to be taken apart and shipped to California in separate pieces, which will be riveted together again after they reach their destination.
They have also laid the keel for another iron steamer for the same Company, which is to be 125 feet long, 22 feet and 8 inches beam, 7 feet depth of hold, and will be completed and ready for sea in ninety days. She is also to have two high-pressure engines.
Three small iron crafts, intended for shoal water, are also nearly completed at these works, for the Panama Railroad Company.
Another branch of their business, is manufacturing " Water Doors;" an improvement recently invented and patented by Mr. Ayres, the object of which is to keep the fire of ocean steamers cool.—They recently fitted out the steam-ships Atlantic and Pacific with this excellent improvement, and are now making the same for the Bailie and Arctic, of Collins' ocean steamers.
There is under way at these works a patent boiler, invented and called " Boardman's Patent," which, when completed, will be sent to Plattsburgh, in the northern part of this state, to be used in an extensive steam manufactory of cloths. It is upon the same principle as the one used at the Franklin Forge in the First Avenue.
A vast amount of gas apparatus is manufactured by Messrs. M. & A., who are constantly overrun with orders for the same.

xxx
in the Chelsea Iron Works, New York city, at which light- draught steamers and gas plants were being made. After the failure of the company and the transfer of its plant to the Novelty Iron Works he was engaged by the latter as
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-04, 18:30

. vessel had passed the experimental stage appears to have been in 1853 when there were built the Gardner Pike, the James H. Chadbourne, the Kate Brigham and the ER Bennett; and in 1855 the Eckford Webb and the William L. Burroughs
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-04, 19:34

Mechanics' magazine and journal of science, arts, and manufactures, Band 53 Von Sholto Percy
November 5, 1850.
Hogg and Delamaters's Foundry,
In west 13th-street, employs about 250 hands. They are now building two large boilers, of great size, for the steam boat Hendrick Hudson, and the machinery for Captain Stoddart's propeller, a vessel ov 1200 tons, intended to ply between this city and Iiiverpool, now in course of being finished, at Perrine, Patterson, and Stacks' yard, Williamaburgh. It will be about 400 horses power.
Also two propellers for parties in Eastport, Maine, for two vessels building there.
In addition to the above, they have in hand a very powerful steam engine, of the largest size, for the sugar house, now in process of erection, on the ruins of Woolsey and Co.'s sugar house, corner of South and Montgomery-streets.

The Civil engineer & [and] architect's journal, Band 16
1853
The Ericsson.—The caloric ship Ericsson is lying at the dock of Messrs. Hogg and Delamaters works, foot of North Thirteenth-street, New York. All the supply and working cylinders of the original construction had been removed, with their pistons, heaters, levers, regenerators, and air-pipes. But there had been retained the bed-plate, the principal framing, shafts, cranks, the beautiful valve-movement, and even the connectingrods, which, in the old arrangement, transferred the motion from the working-beams to the crank. In place of the four huge sets of cylinders standing perpendicularly, there are to be two moderately-sized cylinders on the line of the keel, and inclined towards each other, making an angle with the keel of about forty-five degrees. The supply-cylinders are of the same stroke, four in number. Une is placed on each side of each working cylinder, and worked from the crosshead in the same manner as pumps are often placed—on each side of the air-pump—in condensing marine-engines. It will thus be seen that the present engines of the Ericsson comprise two working and four supply cylinders. The working cylinders are each 6 feet in diameter, with 8 feet stroke. Speaking theoretically of both arrangements, these two moderate-sized double-acting engines are designed to be as efficient as the four large single-acting ones previously employed, in consequence of working with a higher pressure. In these engines the same air is to be used repeatedly under a high pressure. This is the difference between the present and the former engines of the Ericsson. The regene rator—in a different form, hut acting on precisely the same principles, and with, it is presumed, precisely the same effect for good or ill—is retained, and continues to be relied on as the chief economic feature. This is the fundamental feature of the caloric engine; and the supposition that it had been given up would be equivalent to supposing the caloric engine "an obselete idea," which is yet far from being the cage.—American Journal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelius_H._DeLamater

iron steamers
1842 Pioneer 53t 73'1O''x 14'x5'7'' H.R.Worthington, brooklyn, NY (Canada -USA Champlain Canal)
1846 Fire Fly 20 screw R.B.Forbes went to China then back to California
1848 Mist 40t Ericson engine went to California on bark Somerset
1856 ??? 75t paddle went to China on brig Rolling Wave
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-06, 11:40

Longworth's American almanac: New-York register and city directory
1839

Allen James, shipwright 140 Mulberry
Bayles Daniel S. shipwright Corlaers-hook h. 252 Division
Bell Jacob, shipbuilder 122 Lewis
Bell Thaddeus, shipwright 141 Lewis
Bell Thaddeus, shipwright 141 Lewis
Bishop & Simonson, shipbuilders 489 Cherry
Broad Thomas, shipwright 92 Avenue D
Brown David, shipbuilder 134 Goerck h. 116 Lewis
Brown David, shipwright 88 Sheriff
Brown & Bell, shipbuilders 134 Goerck
Capes William r shipwright 56 Harison
Carnley jr. Robert, shipwright 400 Grand
Casilear Francis, shipwright 199 Henry
Casilear John, shipwright 510 Water
Casilear & Smith, shipwrights 510 Water
Clark John, shipwright 508 Water h. 128 Monroe
Deveau John A. shipwright 419 Fourth h. 294 Thir
Doane Charles, shipwright 335 Front
Fickett Francis, shipbuilder 279 Third
Fickett George, shipwright 388 Fifth
Fickett & Thomes, shipwrights Third c. Mangin
Fielding Jeremiah, shipwright 125 Lewis
Flanders Charles M. shipwright 25 Houstoun
Follansbee Timothy C. shipwright 324 Third
Friend James, shipwright 215 Lewis
Furness Robert, shipwright 412. Water h. 223 Madison
Gantz John F. shipwright 224 Walker
Gould Charles, shipwright 610 Water
Grafton Nathaniel, shipwright 116 Houstoun
Hagar Hooper, shipwright 296 Stanton
Kavanagh Michael, shipwright 640 Water
Kyler John, shipwright 11 Goerck
Lawrence Herbert, shipwright 735 h. 699 Water
Lawrence & Sneden, shipwrights 735 Water
Leonard Jacob, shipwright 303 Broome
Lyon Joseph, shipwright 417 Fourth
M'Gie David, shipwright h. 279 Henry
M'Namara Peter, shipwright 442 Water h. 86 Delanccy
Mackey William, shipwright 645 Water
Maher Patrick, shipwright 366 Cherry
Morgan James, shipwright h. 126 Monroe
Morrell Richard, shipwright 64 Cannon
Parsons & Furness, shipwrights 412 Water
Powers John, shipwright 52 Columbia
Reeves Philip, shipwright 396 Cherry
Ring John, shipwright 673 Water
Ring & Co. Zeb. shipwrights 442 Water h. 171 Eastb.way
Roberts Nathan, shipbuilder 13 Lewis *
Rodman William, shipwright 606 h. 486 Water
Saffen James, shipwright 37.J Clinton,
Secor Francis, shipwright 103 Washington
Shepherd James, shipwright 345 Grand
Secor Francis, shipwright 103 Washington
Silkworth John, shipwright 164 Lewis
Smith Charles E. shipwright 295 Front h. 70 Colhmbia
Smith David, shipwright 161 Lewis
Smith Isaac, shipwright 510 Water h. 26 Gouverneur
Storey Stephen, shipwright 508 Water h. — Cnerry
Storey & Clark, shipwrights 508 Water
Thomes John, shipwright 390 Fifth
Tinney Andrew, shipwright 84J- Lewis
Walker Robert, shipwright 292 Madison
Webb, Allen & Ewen, shipbuilders Lewis c. Seventh
Webb, Robertson & Co. shipwrights 92 Washington
Whitfield Joseph, shipwright 48 Houstoun
Whitlock Andrew, shipwright 603 h. 580 Water
Wilkinson Hi* ^emum, shipwright 430 Grand J
Williams Jabez, shipwright Lewis c. Eighth h. 377 Sevetttfo
Williamson John, shipwright 90 Avenue D
Young William, shipwright 401 Fourth
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-04-06, 15:16

Longworth's American almanac: New-York register and city directory
1837

Bell Jacob, shipbuilder 122 Lewis
Brown David, shipbuilder 134 Goerck h. 116 Lewis
Brown & Bell, shipbuilders 134 Goerck
Bishop & Simonson, shipbuilders 489 Cherry
Roberts Nathan, shipbuilder 13 Lewis *
Webb, Allen & Ewen, shipbuilders Lewis c. Seventh

Allen James, shipwright 140 Mulberry
Anspake Frederick, shipwright 8 Cannon

NOT YET REVISED:

Bayles Daniel S. shipwright Corlaers-hook h. 252 Division
Bell Thaddeus, shipwright 141 Lewis
Bell Thaddeus, shipwright 141 Lewis
Broad Thomas, shipwright 92 Avenue D
Brown David, shipwright 88 Sheriff
Capes William r shipwright 56 Harison
Carnley jr. Robert, shipwright 400 Grand
Casilear Francis, shipwright 199 Henry
Casilear John, shipwright 510 Water
Casilear & Smith, shipwrights 510 Water
Clark John, shipwright 508 Water h. 128 Monroe
Deveau John A. shipwright 419 Fourth h. 294 Thir
Doane Charles, shipwright 335 Front
Fickett Francis, shipbuilder 279 Third
Fickett George, shipwright 388 Fifth
Fickett & Thomes, shipwrights Third c. Mangin
Fielding Jeremiah, shipwright 125 Lewis
Flanders Charles M. shipwright 25 Houstoun
Follansbee Timothy C. shipwright 324 Third
Friend James, shipwright 215 Lewis
Furness Robert, shipwright 412. Water h. 223 Madison
Gantz John F. shipwright 224 Walker
Gould Charles, shipwright 610 Water
Grafton Nathaniel, shipwright 116 Houstoun
Hagar Hooper, shipwright 296 Stanton
Kavanagh Michael, shipwright 640 Water
Kyler John, shipwright 11 Goerck
Lawrence Herbert, shipwright 735 h. 699 Water
Lawrence & Sneden, shipwrights 735 Water
Leonard Jacob, shipwright 303 Broome
Lyon Joseph, shipwright 417 Fourth
M'Gie David, shipwright h. 279 Henry
M'Namara Peter, shipwright 442 Water h. 86 Delanccy
Mackey William, shipwright 645 Water
Maher Patrick, shipwright 366 Cherry
Morgan James, shipwright h. 126 Monroe
Morrell Richard, shipwright 64 Cannon
Parsons & Furness, shipwrights 412 Water
Powers John, shipwright 52 Columbia
Reeves Philip, shipwright 396 Cherry
Ring John, shipwright 673 Water
Ring & Co. Zeb. shipwrights 442 Water h. 171 Eastb.way
Rodman William, shipwright 606 h. 486 Water
Saffen James, shipwright 37.J Clinton,
Secor Francis, shipwright 103 Washington
Shepherd James, shipwright 345 Grand
Secor Francis, shipwright 103 Washington
Silkworth John, shipwright 164 Lewis
Smith Charles E. shipwright 295 Front h. 70 Colhmbia
Smith David, shipwright 161 Lewis
Smith Isaac, shipwright 510 Water h. 26 Gouverneur
Storey Stephen, shipwright 508 Water h. — Cnerry
Storey & Clark, shipwrights 508 Water
Thomes John, shipwright 390 Fifth
Tinney Andrew, shipwright 84J- Lewis
Walker Robert, shipwright 292 Madison

Webb, Robertson & Co. shipwrights 92 Washington
Whitfield Joseph, shipwright 48 Houstoun
Whitlock Andrew, shipwright 603 h. 580 Water
Wilkinson Hi* ^emum, shipwright 430 Grand J
Williams Jabez, shipwright Lewis c. Eighth h. 377 Sevetttfo
Williamson John, shipwright 90 Avenue D
Young William, shipwright 401 Fourth
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2011-07-05, 23:20

From Lloyd's List

BOLIVAR Colombian ship , Jefferson from Puerto Cabello
arrived Liverpool 27.05.1825
sailed 27th March
arrived La GUYARA 15.08.
arrived BREMEN 10.07.1826 from La Guayara

LRS 1826
BOLIVAR Ss W&C25
C.Jefferson
356t
built ??Amer
owner M. Quartr
16ft
LiLgour
E2

LRS 1827
BOLIVAR Ss W&C25
C.Jefferson
356t
built ??Amer
owner M. Quartr
16ft
LiGua
E2 (1825)

LRS 1828
BOLIVAR Ss W&C25
C.Jefferson
356t
built ??Amer
owner M'Quartr
16ft
LiLiguir
E2 (1825)

LRS 1829
BOLIVAR Ss W&C25
C.Jefferson
356t
built ??Amer
owner M'Quartr
16ft
LiLaguir
E2 (1825)
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Dołączył(a): 2004-08-03, 01:56

Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2012-04-18, 18:51

Baltimore Patriot, published as BALTIMORE PATRIOT & MERCANTILE ADVERTISER.; Date: 01-09-1823; Volume: XXI; Issue: 6; Page: [2]; Location: Baltimore, Maryland

from New York Gazette
3d April 1821 ships launched in New York
21.10.1820 isabella 500t live oak Eckford's -> Alexander Brown & Co., Baltimore
3.04.1821 Orbit
24.4.1821 Panthea
8.5.1821 James Cropper
.6.1821 Fabius
6.10.1821 Maria
10.10.1821 Wm.Thompson
11.10.1821 Saluda
18.10.1821 Wm.Tell
10.1821 Com. Chauncey
10.1821 Hercules
22.12.1821 Columbia
25.12.1821 Florida
2.01.1822 Hannibal
1822 Citizen
2.01.1822 Savannah
7.03.1822 Jupiter
03.1822 Circassian
1.04.1822 Alfred
18.04.1822 Baltic
05.1822 Howard
05.1822 John Wells
6.06.1822 Superior
15.06.1822 Liverpool
26.06.1822 Montauo
1.07.1822 London
7.07.1822 Aeolus
20.07.1822 New York 500t Brown & Bell -> Liverpool Packets
10.08.1822 American
22.08.1822 Alexander
20.09.1822 William
19.09.1822 Hudson
6.11.1822 Fanny
9.11.1822 Napoleon
14.12.1822 Sabina 400t Noah Brown
14.12.1822 Lewis 400t Noah Brown
18.12.1822 Corinthian
19.12.1822 USS Erie
To be launched Leeds
10.03.1823 Canada 500t Brown & Bell Old Line Liverpool Packets
-------------------
16000 tons
24.1.1824 ??? 600t Brown & Bell Liverpool Packets
20.3.1824 fire on Noah Brown shipyard burned $15,000
- ship nearly finished
- a brig
- 2 steam boat one for New Haven Company was to be launched
6.03.1825 Washington 1000t Brown & Bell
27.04.1825 steam boat 330t Brown & Bell NY-New Haven
26.9.1825 Mobile 320t NY-Mobile service
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Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2012-04-18, 22:30

VESSELS LAUNCHED, 1850 New York.

Builders. Vessels. Rate. Tons.

Lawrence & Sneeden, N. America, steamship. 1850
Westervelt b& Mackey Ocean Clueen, packet.. 1200
Fran. P. Sage, packet.. 1200
William Tell, packet.. 1200
Rhine packet.. 1000
William H. Webb:... Isaac Webb..packet..2000
Vanguard packet.. 1350
Florida steamship.1500
Alabama... steamship.1500
Celestial clipper.. 900
Jos. Walker..packet.. 1350
Union steamship.1500
Jacob Bell Baltic steamship.3700
St. Louis packet..1000
White Squall, clipper. 900
Smith • Dimon Universe ....packet.. 1300
Mandarin,...clipper.. 300
William H. Brown. . Arctic steamship.3500
Boston steamship. 700
New World steamship. 700
New York..steamship. 700
Pacific steamship.1200
William Collyer Chingarora.steamboat. 600
St Lawrence steamboat. 700
Jeremiah Simonson.. .Promethens.steamship.2000
??? steamboat. 100
??? steamboat. 65
Thomas Collyer Island City, steamboat. 280
T.Collyer, steamboat. 250
??? steamboat. 850
Jenny Lind steamboat. 100

no rival. Every great movement in the United States, either originates here, or makes this city the base of its operations. Almost the entire am't of the agricultural products of the great West are poured into her lap. As the seat of commerce, she feels all the variations in the value of cotton, the great regulator of exchange, as sensitively as does the planter himself. In nothing is her superiority more manifest then in the manner she has monopolised the advantages which have flown from the discoveries of gold in California, and the great migration to that Slate. No movement ever affected this city so much in so short a time. New York
Ostatnio edytowano 2012-04-18, 22:45 przez AvM, łącznie edytowano 1 raz
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Dołączył(a): 2004-08-03, 01:56

Re: Stocznie Nowego Yorku

Postprzez AvM » 2012-04-18, 22:37

LAWRENCE & SNEEDEN.

The North America, a first class steamship of 1,850 tons, originally intended for the Norwich and New London Steamboat Company's service at the east, but finally finished for California trade to run between the ports of Panama and San Francisco, under the command of Capt. Bliven, formerly of the Jamestown. Her dimensions are: length, 255 feet; beam, 344; hold, 22. She is built of oak, locust and cedpr, and will be elegantly finished.— She has four masts, a beam engine of 60 inches cylinder and 12 feet stroke. She is a large and strongly built ship, and will be fitted up so as to accommodate 500 passengers. The North America was launched on the 16th inst. all her machinery except the boilers and the shafts being in at the time; and will be finished speedily.

Two steamboats will be built as soon as possible at this yard for Brooks & Barton of Savannah, to run as regular packets between Savannah and Charleston. Belknap, Cunningham & Co. are building the engines at the Phenix Works. These steamers will be small; about 500 or 600 tons burden; length, 180; beam, 27; hold, 11; cylinders, 44 inches; stroke, 10 feet. It is expected that both will be completed by the 1st day of May next.

WESTERVELT & MACKAV.

The William Tell, a fine packet ship, was launched in July by this firm. She is about 1,200 tons burden; owned by Boyd & Hincken, and under the command of Capt. Willard, formerly of the packet Oneida. The Tell is 175 feet long, 37J beam, 32 hold. She sailed on her first voyage on the 6th of August and arrived at Havre on the 29th.

The Matamoros, is a steamship of 900 tons, built for Messrs. Morgan & Harris, and intended for the Mexican Gulf, to ply between New Orleans and Brazos Santiago. She is square rigged forward and is in all respects a strong and safe vessel. Her dimensions are: length, 215; beam, 32; hold, 18; cylinder, 56 inches; stroke, 10 feet. She engine is from the Morgan Works. The Matamoros is ready to be launched.

The steamship Humboldt, previously noticed by us under the name of the Havre, now on the stocks in this yard, and nearly ready for launching, is a splendid specimen of naval architecture. This vessel is the colleague o( the Franklin, and will with her form a line of steam packet* leaving New York once a month for Havre, touching at Southampton on the outward passage to land passengers and mails. Mortimer Livingston is the agent of the line. The Humboldt is 2,500 tons burden, copper fastened and iron braced; she is 280 feet long, 40 feet beam and 28 feet deep. Captain Lines, late of the New York, will take command of the H. The Franklin, Capt. Walton, is ready for sea. The engines of the Humboldt are in progress at the Novelty Works; they are of the side lever pattern, 95 inch cylinder, and 9 feet stroke. The cost of these ships has been stated at ©500,000 each.

The steamship Placer, is in a slate of forwardness that promises launching in a lew weeks. She is built for Capt. Skiddy, and Davis and Brooks. She will be of 1,100 tons burden; length, 220 feet; beam, 36; hold, 24i. Stillman, Allen & Co. are building her engines.

The Rhine, a beautiful packet ship of 1,000 tons built for E. D. Hurlbut & Co's. Havre line, was launched a few days since. She will be under the command of Capt Doane, late of the Tuskina.— She is 106 feet long, 36 beam, and 284 hold; she has three decks; the upper one being occupied by the cook-houses, cow-house, windlass, closets, &e, &c.

The Underwriter, thus named in complement to Walter R. Jones, Esq., will be launched in November, and it is advertised to sail on the 11th of December for Liverpool, under command of Captain Shipley, late of the John R. Skiddy. The Underwriter is to be 1,100 tons burden, a three-decker, and is very strongly built; length, 185 feet; beam, 38; hold, 22; built of live oak and cedar. She will take her place in R. Kermit's Red-Star Line of Liverpool packets.

A clipper ship is under way for A. A. Low, intended for the Canton trade, and to be placed under the command ol Capt. Palmer, late of the Oriental.— The new ship will be 1,050 tons burden, 190 feet long, 39 feet beam, and 214 hold; she will be one of the finest sail vessels turned out this season.

WILLIAM B. WEBB.

The Joseph Walker, on the stocks at our last report, was launched early in August; she is commanded by Capt. Hoxie, and has taken her place in Samuel Thompson & Nephew's Black-Star Line for Liverpool. As the Joseph Walker was built under the personal supervision of her popular and able captain, and of course everything about her done as it should be, we append a full description of her, which will be of interest to builders and owners. The arrangements for the first, second and third cabins, and for steerage passengers, are very complete. There are three sky lights to the second and third cabins, and three, sky lights to the steerage, and four separate gangways to the steerage, which is well ventilated from the deck and side lights below. The cooking arrangements are complete, and are acknowledged by most shipmasters out of the port to be the best in use. On the deck is an engine of sufficient power to throw the water over the maintop gallant yard, to which is attached one hundred and twenty feet of hose. There is likewise introduced through the sides oi the ship, patent valves, which will flood the hold of the ship with water, in a short time, in case of fire, or for cleansing purposes, which is one of the most useful improvements got up for ships. The forecastles are fitted up in keeping with other parts of the ship, having tables, lockers, and a place for a library in each, which, no doubt, will be supplied with interesting books. Her tonnage is l,32o tons. The following are her dimensions: 180 feet long on deck, 50 beam, and 23 feet hold; keel white oak, two tiers deep, made in 8 pieces, 16 inches sided, and 34 inches deep, bolted together with copper bolts; stem white oak, sided 16 inches; apron live oak, sided 30 inches; night heads live oak, sided 12 inches; all fastened with large copper bolts below deep loaded line, and large iron bolts above deep loaded line. Stern post white oak, sided at head 18 inches, at keel 16 inches; inner post live oak; main and other transome all live

oak, and well fastened with large bolts; fashion pieces of live oak, being double; floor timbers of white oak, 24 feet long, sided 12 to 14 inches, and molded 19 inches; first, second, and third futtocks white oak, sided 10 to 11 inches; fourth futtox of live oak, sided 10 inches; top limbers of live oak, sided 9 to 10 inches; stancheons of locust, and sided 9 to 10 inches; thirteen frames forward, and 13 frames aft; of live oak; keelsons, each end, forward and aft, of live oak; dead woods each end, and stemsons live oak; keelsons amidships 3 tiers deep, of white oak, sided 16 inches, and making from bottom of keel to top of keelson, a mass of timber 8 feet 9 inches through, all well bolted together with 1} inch bolts; keelson at floor heads of pitch pine, sided 15 inches, two streaks and two tier deep, all square, fastened to frame and to each other with inch iron and 1| inch locust treenails; bilge streaks, seven in number, 8 inches thick; lower deck clamps 8 inches thick; ceiling between clamps and bilge streaks 7 inches thick, and all square fastened with \ inch iron and If inch locust treenails, and all the outside fastenings through the same in addition to the above; ceiling on flat of floor 4 inches, white oak; lower deck beams pitch pine, 18 to 20 inches sided, and 15 to 16 inches molded; lodging and bosom knees of lower deck of white oak, sided 10 to 14 inches, and very large body and arms and fastened with 1J inch bolts; mast partners of pitch pine, very large and double kneed; stancheons in lower hold very large and each one kneed to main keelson, and beams with 4 knees, all well fastened; deck breast hooks of live oak and breast hooks in hold of white oak and very large, incl uding wider breast hooks, which are all well fastened with a great number of large bolts; lower deck water ways of pitch piue, three tier and large, lei down into ends of beams and fastened with three bolts in every timber, and frame ceiling between decks of pitch pine, six -inches square, fastened with iron bolts and locust treenails; breast hooks between decks very large and fastened with a great number of large iron bolls; upper deck clamps of 7 inches square, fastened with i iion bolts, and 1{ locust treenails; beams of pitch pine, sided 14 to 18 inches, and molded 12 inches; lodging and bosom knees of white oak, sided 7 inches; hanging knees to every beam, sided 10 to 14 inches, and are thoroughly bolted with 14 iron bolls; water ways pitch pine, and fastened to every timber and beam with 1 inch bolts; deck plank of while pine, 34 inches thick, and bolted edgewise to water ways and timbers; planskhire and rails of white oak, 6 inches thick; forecastle beams kneed to lrame of the ship, which run.up high above forecastle deck, with oak knees: catheads bedded and solid in frame of the ship, and kneed to the same with large while oak knees, very heavily bolted; a very large breast hook over the bowsprit and one below it fastened with a great number of bolts; the frame, whole length of poop, is double, and each poop deck beam kneed to the same with hanging knees; poop bulkhead of white oak, 4 inches thick and bolted with a great number of bolts, and kneed to poop deck beam and upper deck beams, which are very large pilch pine. Such is a brief sketch ot the way in which^tur world-renowned" packet ships are made. The Joseph Walker is now on her first voyage out.

The steamship Union is just launched. She is a fine sea steamer of 1,500 tons, 212 feet long, 34 feet wide and 22 deep with two side lever engines of 65 inch cylinder and 8 feet stroke, built at the Allaire Works. Spofford & Tiles'ton are the owners, and Capt. Build, late of the Northerner, will command her; she will go in the New York and Charleston steam packet line.

The Samuel M. Fox is on the stocks. She is intended for Livingston's Havre Packet Line, and is named after the head of the late firm of Fox & Livingston. She will be about 1,600 tons burden, 170 feet long, 37 feet beam, and 20 feet hold; her building and furniture will be equal to those of our first class packets.

Another Packet ship, the mate of the Samuel M. Fox, and in all respects like her, will be built by Mr. Webb. The keel has just been laid.

The Golden Gate, a steamship of 2,000 tons burden, is goin» up for Howland & Aspinwall's Pacific Line. She will be launched in about three months. Her length is 275 leet; beam, 40; hold,

t

20; she is heavily braced, and will be finished" in I the must substantial manner. She is to have two| oscillating engines, f:ora the Novelty works, 0185 inch cylinder and 9 feet stroke.

A clipper ship keel has been laid lor Taylor & Merrill. The vessel is intended for the Canton trade, and will be of the first class for speed. She will be 180 feet long.

JACOB BELL.

The While Squall, a beautiful clipper ship, built by this veteran, is now on her way to China via San Francisco. She belongs to Messrs. Booth and Edgar. We have lost our memoranda of her dimensions; but we believe she measures about 1,000 tons. She has been got up with an eye to speed, and will probably make one ot the quickest voyages ever performed.

The Planter, a propeller of 2,000 tons, originally intended tor a packet, is now in progress. She is a strongly fastened live oak ship, owned by SpotTord and Tiieston, and is to run to Liverpool—and will be the first American propeller ever employed in the European trade. The Pioneer will be fitted up with every convenience for the comfort and accommodation of all on board. It is estimated that she will carry 2,700 tons, drawing 20J leet of water. Her fastenings will be thorough, with five kelsons running fore and aft. Her engines will be built at the West Point Foundry at Cold Spring; the cylinders are eights-five inches in diamett r, with a five-foot stroke, the whole resting on a solid loundalion of at least fifty inches in depth. Her owners feel assured of her making the passage between Liverpool and New York easily in sixteen days. She will be commanded by Capt. Eldridge, late of the packet ship Koscius, a gentleman intimately known as a thorough commander by all in the habit of voyaging between this port and Liverpool; the propeller's paddles will have a diameter of 15 leet.

A steamship keel is laid for Spofford and Tileston. The ship will measure 800 tons; length, 200 feet; beam, 32; hold, 21. She is intended to run in connection with the Southerner to Charleston. The engine is from the Novelty Works. A side lever, 70-inch cylinder, 9 feet stroke. We understand that the ship will be called The Berry, alter the popular captain of that name.

SMITH & D1MON.

The Mandarin, launched on the day of the publication of our last report, is a beautiful clipper ship built for the East India trade.'- She is nearly 800 tons burden; length, 150 feet; beam, 34; hold, 19: Goodhue and Co. we believe are the owners. She is now on her outward voyage via San Francisco.

A Steamship, of 2,200 tons, the partner of the Golden Gate, is on the stocks for Howland and Asplnwall. She is 225 feet long, 40 beam, 20 hold. Her engines are to be made at the Novelty Works —they are like those of the Golden Gate, oscillating engines of 85 inch cylinder and 9 feet strode.

WILLIAM U. BROWN.

Tke Pacific, a splendid steamship, was launched a few days since, her engines being in working order, and steam up. (Mr. B. had launched two boats in running order in January last.) The Pacific made a trial trip on Wednesday last, and pro ved herself all that could be anticipated, running past the British steamer Asui, the bragging ship of the Cunard line, with perfect ease. The P. was built for Capt. Jarvis and others; Capt. J. will take command, and expects to get off in a lew weeks.— The dimensions of the vessel are; length, 230 feet j beam, 31; hold, 19; tonnage, 1,200. Her engine, one of the upright pattern, was built by H. R. Dunham; cylinder, 70 inches; stroke, 10 leet. The Pacific bids fair to be one of the most rapid vessels yet sent to the Western Coast.

A steamer is now under way at Mr. Brown's yard, under the superintendence and to be commanded by Capt. Dunn, late of the ship America. She is intended to run on the Sacramento, is 400 tons, burden, 170 feet long, 26 wide and 104 hold. Her engine, built by J. F. Rodman, is now on board; it is 35 inch cylinder and 10 feet stroke.— She will be launched in the course of two weeks, with steam up ready for a start.

Another steamer, for the Pacific trade, is under way; she is 215 feet long, 28 wide and iO feet deep j burden, 600 tons. J. E. Coffee is building

her engine, a 42 inch cylinder with 9 feet stroke, which will be put in before she is launched, so that she, too, may go into th water with her paddles in motion.
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